Conservation Policy Webinar Series

Conservation Policy Webinar Descriptions

50 Years of Endangered Species Legislation (00:52:13)

We are happy to announce the second presentation with Michael Young, Department of Interior, Assistant Solicitor for Fish and Wildlife. Mr. Young has over three decades of experience with the DOI and will be providing a number of new presentations for the monthly Conservation Policy Series. The¬†evolution of Endangered Species legislation will be the topic of today’s program. Mr. Young will detail the process by which Endangered Species legislation has gone from a primitive idea with little legal force in 1966, to the Endangered Species Act today, considered one of the strongest environmental regulations in existence. August 11, 2016.

Administrative Procedure Act: Compliance Notes & Non-Compliance Risks (01:05:40)

We are pleased to announce this forth presentation with Michael Young, former Department of Interior, Assistant Solicitor for Fish and Wildlife. Mr. Young has over three decades of experience with the DOI and has recorded this presentation for the monthly Conservation Policy Series. The Administrative Procedure Act covers virtually all administrative activity within the Department of the Interior. With 2016 having been the 70th anniversary of the regulations, Michael Young, the former Assistant Solicitor for Fish and Wildlife, will discuss the role this statute has had on Fish and Wildlife Service actions and the risks associated with non-compliance of the act.

Native American Policy (00:54:25)

Presented by Scott L. Aikin, Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, National Native American Programs Coordinator USFWS, Director's Office. August 14, 2016.

In the 20 years since the Service issued our original Native American Policy, tribes have developed greater capacity in managing resources. During that time, as well, tribes have shared “traditional knowledge” with the Service. In the 20 years since the Service issued our original Native American Policy, tribes have developed greater capacity in managing resources. This updated policy reflects the interest of the tribes and the Service to manage resources cooperatively, where appropriate. During that time, as well, tribes have shared “traditional knowledge” with the Service, a practice this policy encourages as we consider scientific and commercial information. The policy states that Native Americans should have access to Service-managed lands and waters for exercising cultural, ceremonial, medicinal, and traditional activities to the extent practicable, permitted by law, and consistent with Service functions. In addition, the policy addresses tribal uses of plants and animals for cultural and religious expression. The Service encourages cooperative law enforcement, though we come in short of cross-deputation, which is not provided for in federal law. The policy states the Service’s support for tribal capacity building and assistance, including both opening Service training to tribal members and negotiating self-determination contracts with tribes (the latter carried over from the 1994 policy.) An implementation and monitoring section includes a commitment to train employees to improve understanding of laws and history affecting the federal relationship with tribes and to enhance employees’ abilities to consult and coordinate with tribal governments. As part of implementation, the Service will monitor its projects and programs and evaluate the policy’s effectiveness. The Service expects that some Regions may promulgate step-down Region-specific policies and implementation plans. Disputes and disagreements between tribes and the Service concerning policy implementation will be handled at appropriate levels for resolution. The policy includes a responsibilities chart that informs employees of their responsibilities when their work affects tribal interests. The Service has already begun implementation and after final publication will roll out further training and education opportunities for Service employees to more effectively carry out the Department’s tribal trust responsibility. Scott Aiken, Native American Liaison with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, will be presenting on the impacts that this policy has across the service. He will speak to the role that the policy plays in recognizing cultural and traditional activities on Service-managed lands, cooperative law enforcement, training opportunities, and an explanation of the responsibilities when working with tribes.

NEPA (00:46:00)

Diana Whittington, Wildlife Biologis, FWS Division of Migratory Bird Management, will present on the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) from her perspective as a field biologist and as a biologist in Headquarters. May 12, 2016.

The presentation will talk about the proactive nature of the NEPA statute, and how it is reflected in current initiatives. It will touch briefly upon the five NEPA mandates, relate experiences of how applying the mandates led to more effective outcomes, and make recommendations for how to make NEPA "a best mechanism for precluding the need to list species."

The 30th Anniversary of the Endangered Species Act Constultation Regulations (01:03:33)

Presented by Mike Young, Assistant Solicitor for Fish and Wildlife. December 7, 2016.

We are pleased to announce the third presentation with Michael Young, Department of Interior, Assistant Solicitor for Fish and Wildlife. Mr. Young has over three decades of experience with the DOI and has recorded this presentation for the monthly Conservation Policy Series. The consultation regulations within the Endangered Species Act have played a significant role in the implementation of the act by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. With 2016 being the 30th anniversary of the regulations, Mr. Young will discuss the statutory history and possible future of these regulations from his perspective as an attorney with the Department of Interior.

The Centennial of the U.S. / Canada Migratory Bird Conventions & the Wildlife Management Role of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (00:37:59)

We are happy to announce the first of four presentations with Michael Young, Department of Interior, Assistant Solicitor for Fish and Wildlife. Mr. Young has over three decades of experience with the DOI and will be providing a number of new presentations for monthly Conservation Policy Series topics this summer and fall.

His first presentation covered the Centennial of the U.S. - Canada Migratory Bird Convention. This presentation was been pre-recorded. During the broadcast, Mr. Young was available in the Livestream chat room to respond to questions or comments.

The Migratory Bird Convention was originally entered into between the United States and the United Kingdom (on behalf of Canada) in 1916. Mr. Young will discuss the catalytic effect of the Canadian Treaty on the emergence of the FWS as a wildlife management agency, as well as the Service's continued evolution in the field over the last 100 years. Please join us, July 14 at 2:00 pm ET! Who should attend: Federal employees who interact with or are interested in Migratory Bird Convention.