The Conservation Lecture Series at NCTC
Writers, Scientists, Filmmakers, Conservationists, Historians Speak to the Public at NCTC

The National Conservation Training Center invites prominent conservationists, writers, historians, scientists, filmmakers, and educators to discuss their work to a broad and interested public. All talks are held at the Byrd Auditorium at the National Conservation Training Center.  No tickets or reservations are required, the public is encouraged to attend. If you would like more information on the speaker series contact: Mark Madison, 304-876-7276, mark_madison@fws.gov. These talks are co-sponsored by The Friends of the NCTC.

Did you miss a lecture? Historian Mark Madison typically interviews speakers while they are in town. View recorded interviews at Conservationists in Action.


Upcoming Virtual Public Lectures: Environmental Historian Char Miller on “Biology, Conservation, and the ​​​​​​​Administrative State in Late 19th and early 20th C America”

On Thursday June 24, 2021 at 3:00 p.m. (ET) Environmental Historian Char Miller will present “Biology, Conservation, and the Administrative State in Late 19th and early 20th C America.” online on the National Conservation Training Center Livestream at https://nctc.fws.gov/broadcasts.

Pomona College Environmental Historian Char Miller will explore the links between federal scientists, economic development and the emergence of a more powerful nation-state in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Inside government, the cadre of researchers in the Biological Survey, such as C. Hart Merriam, Vernon Bailey, and Florence Merriam Bailey, identified, cataloged, and mapped the nation’s flora and fauna with an eye to ascertaining its economic value. In the academy, botanists like JM Coulter and his student William L. Bray—among many others—collaborated with the Biological Survey and other Bureaus to contribute to this larger project of marrying the scientific enterprise with the country’s growth and development. Their collective activism expanded the range and reach of these agencies, and was particularly propelled by the energetic TR who did not just establish the first wildlife refuges and vastly expand the number and size of national forests, but in doing so constructed what Brian Balogh calls the Administrative State.

Char Miller is the WM Keck Professor of Environmental Analysis and History at Pomona College and is author most recently of Hetch Hetchy: A History in Documents, co-editor of Theodore Roosevelt: Naturalist in the Arena and the Nature of Hope: Grassroots Organizing, Environmental Justice, and Political Change. Forthcoming is West Side Rising: How San Antonio’s 1921 Flood Devastated a City and Sparked a Latino Environmental Justice Movement and a biography of botanist/ecologist William L. Bray.

​​​​​​​This talk is as part of NCTC’s Conservation Lecture Series, which is cosponsored by The Friends of the NCTC (http://www.friendsofnctc.org).

The Public Virtual Lecture Series are recorded and can be found by visiting NCTC's Virtual Public Lecture Series web page.

 

 

The Annual American Conservation Film Festival 50 Films, Filmmakers, Speakers Shepherdstown, WV TBA